Overusing Technology

A+student+who+is+working+hard+in+a+classroom+using+their+laptop+to+help+them.

A student who is working hard in a classroom using their laptop to help them.

Written by Lillian Tan

As society transitions towards a new age of development, students must adapt to the technological advancements as well. Many schools are transferring physical paperwork to online assignments due to efficiency and cost of manufacturing paper. The PSAT will be digitalized in Fall 2023 while SAT will be online as of Spring 2024.

With all of these changes, students must be prepared to spend more time with their devices than they already have. As a result, people must discipline their daily consumption of media as the consequences could have devastating effects on mental and physical health.

“I don’t really feel like doing anything when I get home.” junior Cathy Vi-do said.

“Even using my phone makes me tired.”

Many people use technology as entertainment, and when consuming digital material, such as e-books, movies, shows, games, and VR, there’s a high risk of eye strain combined with online school work. In Kerr, some students have stated that they’re on a electronic device for almost the entire day.

“I usually stop around 11:00PM and begin at 7:00AM.” freshman Makayla Diep said.

In order to combat the consequences of technology overload, people should begin taking measures to improve their habits. Instead of spending hours on a device, people should try taking more frequent breaks and resting their eyes. Optometrists recommend that for every 20 minutes spent on electronic devices, you should look 20 meters away for 20 seconds in order to relax your eyes from being too focused.¬†¬†Listening to a podcast, audiobook, or taking a small nap will also provide a form of entertainment that will allow one’s eyes to rest.